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Old Town of Alcúdia

Old Town of Alcúdia

The historic old town of Alcúdia

old town of Alcúdia in Mallorca Alcúdia is located on the north coast of Mallorca and was found in pre-Christian times around the year 70 BC by the Romans. The historic centre is surrounded by a massive city wall and welcomes you with its medieval ambience.

Medieval flair in Alcúdia
The old town of Alcúdia is a medieval gem in the north of Mallorca. The town sprang from the Roman settlement of Pollentia  - the remains of which are between the town and the port of Port d'Alcúdia and are worth seeing. Under King Jaume II of Mallorca, the imposing city wall with its crenelated towers was completed in 1362. Parts of it, such as the city gates Porta de Mallorca and Porta del Moll are still preserved today. The city wall is partially accessible and on a stroll over the old fortification you can enjoy a fantastic view over the old town. Narrow streets wind through the city centre of Alcúdia, which also features the impressive Casa Consistorial town hall on Plaça Espanya, which was built in the Renaissance style. The lovingly restored façades of the houses reveal both the Moorish and Roman influences left behind in this northern town.
 
Churches and museums in the city centre
One of the oldest buildings in Alcúdia is the gothic Orati de Santa Anna church, which dates back to the 13th century. It rises at the southern edge of the city wall. The chapel of Sant Crist was built in the characteristic architectural style of the Renaissance. The inauguration took place at the end of the 17th century. The parish church of Sant Jaume (Saint James) fills a gap in the city wall and dates from the late 19th century. Inside is a small museum that displays sacred exhibits and a collection of historic church vestments. Archaeological exhibits from Roman times are presented in the Monographic Museum. These include amphorae, coins, marble tablets and mosaics from antiquity. The exhibition rooms are housed in a 16th-century building that was formerly used as a hospital.