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Sa Dragonera

Sa Dragonera

Sa Dragonera - uninhabited rocky island on the southwest coast

Sa Dragonera in MallorcaThe rocky island of Sa Dragonera is a scenic gem off the southwest coast of Mallorca. The uninhabited island is a protected area and is a delightful destination for a day trip.


Pure nature and rare animal life on Sa Dragonera
Sa Dragonera off the southwest coast of Mallorca administratively is part of the municipality of Andratx and mesmerises visitors with its intact natural landscape. The rock faces rise steeply up to 350 m above sea level. The island is just 4.2 km long and only 900 m at its widest point. An endemic subspecies of the Balearic lizard has developed on the island, the wall lizard. Sa Dragonera is also a retreat for many species of birds. On the steep cliffs to the northwest, Eleonora falcons have established a large breeding colony. In addition to Mediterranean gulls and peregrine falcons about 400 breeding pairs of the rare Balearic shearwater are living on the island. Wide areas of the rocky island are covered by Mediterranean maquis scrubland and wild rosemary. The orange-red lichen is particularly striking and was formerly used in the production of dyes.


Sa Dragonera for a day trip
You can visit the island of Sa Dragonera for the day during your holiday in your Mallorca holiday. From April to October, boats usually leave once a day from the small fishing village of Sant Elm and Port d'Andratx. After about 20 minutes you dock in the small natural harbour in ‘Robber's Bay’. Not far from the dock is a ranger station, where you get an overview of the island’s flora and fauna. In addition, you can join a guided hike led by a ranger or alternatively explore the untouched island on your own. It takes about three hours to reach the highest point of the island, the 353 m high Na Pòpia - home to Far Vell lighthouse, which is no longer in operation. The remains of two watchtowers on Sa Dragonera date back to the 18th century.